Music News

Burning Man

Burning Man is a festival, known all over the world, that happens every year in northern Nevada, USA. Every year, the festival starts on the last Monday in August and ends on the first Monday in September (which is also Labor Day in the U.S.).
The large wooden sculpture of a man is set on fire on the festival and that’s the cause for its name, Burning Man. The Black Rock desert is the exact and perfect place where Burning Man is organized. That’s because is far away from any cities or towns. Although, the desert is very dry, so people who go to Burning Man have to bring their own shelter, water, and food.

The festival has been started since 1990. Now, 65,000 participants (closer to 80,000 including vendors and volunteers) are hosted by Burning Man for the week-long arts festival. But, organizers want to expand to 100,000 people. The annual review is currently made by Nevada Bureau of Land Management. And, the review is how the event affects near environments and community. The organization has proposed long-term expansion.

More space for the art pieces

Besides the expansion, organizers are also looking for space of 22 miles (about 500 acres). Space will be closed off for Burning Man to support the art pieces and increased capacity. The proposal is that art pieces will probably increase to 400 compared to 330 in 2017. Also, 1,000 art cars/modified vehicles compared to 600 and 2,000 themed art camps compared to 1,100.

Because of the successful proposal, organizers have met with representatives of the three communities most affected by Burning Man: Reno, Lovelock, and Gerlach. The financial support of Burning Man brings in over $50 million to the state of Nevada each year.

However, locals are concerned about water supply, law enforcement services, disruption of the peaceful, traffic and remote setting many locals appreciate about the desert area.

Each year, Burning Man receives criticism about its expansion. The festival has reached the point where tech tycoons are shipping fresh lobsters out to the desert. No matter what, organizers have proposed the growing with reports of minimal environmental change due to their strict “leave no trace” policy.